Tamal Saha

Tamal Saha is the founder of AppsCode. He has been involved with Kubernetes project since 2015. He has founded a number of popular open source projects like Voyager, KubeDB, Stash, Guard, KubeVault, etc.

Announcing Voyager v2022.06.20

We are pleased to announce the release of Voyager v2022.06.20. In this release, we have released operator and HAProxy images to fix CVE-2022-1586 & CVE-2022-1587. The detailed commit by commit changelog can be found here. CVE Fixes We have updated the base image used for Voyager operator to address CVE-2022-1586 & CVE-2022-1587. ExternalName Service Fixes In this release we have fixed a regression bug when Ingresses use ExternalName Services as backends.

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Running Production-Grade Databases on Kubernetes - Challenges and Solutions

As containers are taking over the world of software development, Kubernetes has emerged as the platform that lets developers seamlessly deploy, scale, run applications, and manage their life cycles. Kubernetes is a DevOps game-changer since it allows teams to focus on applications and deployment rather than worrying about the underlying infrastructure. Given the multi-cloud environment in which DevOps teams perform, Kubernetes abstracts the cloud provider and enables enterprises to build cloud-native applications that can run anywhere.

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Announcing Voyager v2022.04.13

We are pleased to announce the release of Voyager v2022.04.13. In this release, we have released operator and HAProxy images to fix CVE-2022-28391. The detailed commit by commit changelog can be found here. CVE Fixes We have updated the base image used for Voyager operator to address CVE-2022-28391. What Next? Please try the latest release and give us your valuable feedback. If you want to install Voyager, please follow the installation instruction from here.

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Announcing KubeDB v2022.03.28

We are pleased to announce the release of KubeDB v2022.03.28. This release is a bug fix release for v2022.02.22 . In this release we have fixed a memory leak in Postgres sidecar (known as pg-coordinator) which will cause the postgres pod to restart due to OOMKill by Kubernetes. Our regular feature release is planned to be out in 2 weeks. If you are not affected by this particular issue, you can ignore this patch release.

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Announcing Voyager v2022.03.17

We are pleased to announce the release of Voyager v2022.03.17. We have updated the HAProxy version to 2.5.5 in this release. The post highlights the import bug fixes in this release. The detailed commit by commit changelog can be found here. CVE Fixes We have updated the base image used for Voyager operator to address all known CVE reports by Trivy scanner. HAProxy Support In this release we added support for alpine and debian based image for HAProxy 2.

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Announcing Voyager v2022.01.01

We are pleased to announce the release of Voyager v2022.01.01. We have updated the HAProxy version to 2.5.0 in this release. The post highlights the import bug fixes in this release. The detailed commit by commit changelog can be found here. HAProxy Support In this release we added support for alpine and debian based image for HAProxy 2.5.0 and 2.4.10. We have also added images with major.minor-flavor tags, so that users can stay up to date on the HAProxy image version.

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Announcing KubeDB & Stash v2021.11.24

We are pleased to announce the release of KubeDB and Stash v2021.11.24. This post lists all the major changes done in this release since v2021.09.30. The headline features of this release are OpenSearch support, InnoDB Cluster support for MySQL, support for PostgreSQL version 14.1 and PostGIS. General API Improvements Custom Labels/Annotations Support: Now you can provide custom labels/annotations to the pods, pod’s controller (ie. StatefulSets), and services for any supported databases.

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Announcing Voyager v2021.10.18

We are pleased to announce the release of Voyager v2021.10.18. This release is a patch release for v2021.09.15. The post highlights the import bug fixes in this release. The detailed commit by commit changelog can be found here. Voyager v1/v1beta1 Ingress api conversion In this release, we have fixed a panic that would occur when converting v1beta1 Ingress with multiple tls secrets in v1 api format. In v1 api, we have removed the deprecated headerRules and rewriteRules from v1beta1 api.

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Announcing KubeDB v2021.09.30

We are pleased to announce the release of KubeDB v2021.09.30. This post lists all the major changes done in this release since v2021.09.09. The headline features of this release are Redis Sentinel mode support and Offline volume expansion support for MongoDB. The detailed commit by commit changelog can be found here. Redis Added support for provisioning Redis sentinel mode instances with sentinel monitoring Added TLS support for Sentinel Monitoring Cluster MongoDB In this release, we have added support for Offline volume expansion of MongoDB nodes.

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Announcing Voyager v2021.09.15

We are pleased to announce the release of Voyager v2021.09.15. This post lists all the major changes done in this release since v12.0.0. This release offers support for the latest Kubernetes version 1.22 and upgrades HAProxy to 2.4.4. Voyager v2021.09.15 introduces Community & Enterprise Edition and deprecates prior releases of Voyager operators. The detailed commit by commit changelog can be found here. Kubernetes 1.22 As you may know, Kubernetes 1.22 removed several deprecated beta APIs that were used by Voyager.

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Announcing KubeDB v2021.09.09

We are pleased to announce the release of KubeDB v2021.09.09. This post lists all the major changes done in this release since v2021.08.23. This release is primarily a bug fix release for v2021.08.23. We have also added support for MongoDB 5.0.2. The detailed commit by commit changelog can be found here. KubeDB API Various KubeDB supported databases currently uses a coordinator sidecar for failover and recovery of clustered databases. This includes PostgreSQL, MongoDB, MySQL, MariaDB and Redis.

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Announcing KubeDB v2021.08.23

We are pleased to announce the release of KubeDB v2021.08.23. This post lists all the major changes done in this release since v2021.06.23. This release offers support for the latest Kubernetes version 1.22. The KubeDB CLI now has exciting new features. MongoDB now uses the official docker images. Elasticsearch supports the latest xpack and opendistro versions and provides pre-built Docker images with snapshot plugins. KubeDB managed Redis now provides Password Authentication for the default user.

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AppsCode introduces KubeDB Enterprise - An Enterprise-grade Cloud Native Database Management System

SAN LEANDRO, Calif. – AppsCode, a global leader in Enterprise-grade Kubernetes-native Data Platforms, has released KubeDB Enterprise Edition, a production-grade cloud-native database management solution for Kubernetes. KubeDB Enterprise edition is the open core version of popular open source project KubeDB. It includes all the features (clustering, etc.) of KubeDB Community Edition and extends it by automating Day 2 DBA tasks, such as database backup/recovery, upgrading version, horizontal and vertical scaling, TLS/SSL support, updating configuration post provisioning, connection pooling, etc.

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30-Jun-2020

Relicensing Stash & KubeDB

AppsCode is relicening various components of the Stash and KubeDB products. We have decided to use simple, standardized, plain-language software source code licenses from the PolyForm Project. Please see the table below for the upcoming changes: Why now? AppsCode started as a commercial entity to accelerate the adoption of Kubernetes and containers in the Enterprise. We launched a number of open source products like Voyager, Stash, KubeDB, KubeVault, Kubeform, etc. Consequently, we began receiving many feature requests, bug reports and general support questions via our GitHub repositories and public slack account.

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Introducing ResourceDescriptor: A Generic API for defining Kubernetes Resource Graph

Kubernetes has own the container orchestrator war. One of the key contributors to its success is the ability to extend Kubernetes by the end users. The primary way users extend Kubernetes is by defining new resource types. This is called Custom Resource Definitions (CRD) in the Kubernetes parlance. Users can write a controller that can reconcile users’ desired specification to a cluster. Controllers that capture operational knowledge of a software application are commonly know as Kubernetes operators.

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The case for AppBinding

Kubernetes has become the de-facto orchestrator for the cloud native world. Kubernetes upholds the philosophy that the core should be small and allow developers to write their own extensions. One way to introduce new resource types is using CustomResourceDefintions (CRD) (originally known as ThirdPartyResources). Using CRDs anyone can define a new resource type that behaves like standard Kubernetes resources. This allows anyone to write a controller for custom resources and capture operational knowledge in a software form.

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